Franco Lorenzi, together with his brother Aldo, is the rightly proud owner of the most famous, historic and renowned boutique in Milan of razors, blades and shaving items: in this Q&A he shares their truly unique collection.

The Lorenzi shop, one of the most refined and historical "boutiques"; in Milan, is located in Via Montenapoleone 9, in the heart of the luxury district, in the very same spaces where Giovanni Lorenzi (father of Franco and Aldo) opened his cutlery shop in January 1929.

The owners' passion for their job, and their culture and curiosity for their beautiful objects, is a relevant part of the magic that bewitches not only the customers who visit the shop, but also the curious visitors who approach the Collection: a unique repertory of objects for shaving that has been enriched since the early Forties, and that is now displayed in the Lorenzi private gallery, in the heart of the Milan.

The objects that have been collected, purchased or found over the years have gone through a careful inventory process, which made it possible to proceed to a meaningful selection of the most extraordinary pieces to be displayed at the gallery.

In this space, about 4000 razors and shaving instruments are presented: a particular section is devoted to patents, about 450, which contribute to underline the evolution of both the collection and the art of shaving.

The owners' passion for their job, and their culture and curiosity for their beautiful objects, is a relevant part of the magic that bewitches not only the customers who visit the shop, but also the curious visitors who approach the Collection

Among Franco Lorenzi' favorite models: the same razor which used by Gabriele d'Annunzio, or the razor for left-handers; the first wooden razor for lady, the electric razor Gillette, the smallest existing razor and the most expensive and difficult to find.

The collection can currently be visited by appointment (+ 39 02 76 02 28 48) at the historic Palazzo Melzi of Cusano, where it has been displayed for the last 12 years.
However, in September 2008 a move is expected.

Public institutions seem in fact not to have realized, unfortunately, the importance of preserving and giving visibility to this small yet precious collection, which runs the risk of disappearing.
Which would be a real pity: who would not be happy to hold and display, in their own city, such a unique museum?