I decided to investigate more deeply into the evolution of form, starting from the hand-woven fabrics I was creating and turning the bi-dimensional character of fabrics into a three-dimensional volume, which is the fundamental element of my creations.

What is your story? When did you start your activity?

Passion and creativity are the key elements of my story.

I started my activity ten years ago, driven by a wish to search for beauty in a creative process. Of course I had to do a great deal of research and experimentation, but, mostly, I needed a great deal of passion.

What was your educational process and why did you decide to pursue this trade?

After graduating from Accademia di Belle Arti di Brera in Milan with a dissertation on “Clothes as sculptures, a possible identity”, I decided to investigate more deeply into the evolution of form, starting from the hand-woven fabrics I was creating and turning the bi-dimensional character of fabrics into a three-dimensional volume, which is the fundamental element of my creations.

In fact, I start from the finished piece of clothing, make up a paper pattern, sew a prototype, then make a drawing, which is the last step of my creative process

#

My client is a woman with a strong personality, a cultivated woman, choosing what she likes, not what fashion dictates

Therefore, you arrived at clothing via art?

Yes. With an art background rather than a sartorial one, I have always used fabrics as a material to be modelled on a manikin. My piece of clothing does not grow out of a drawing, but from a thought, from my instinct. As I move my hands, it takes place.

My working method would be defined as “à rebours” in French. Moving backwards. In fact, I start from the finished piece of clothing, make up a paper pattern, sew a prototype, then make a drawing, which is the last step of my creative process. Actually, at least half of my garments are unique and do not require any paper pattern to be realised.

Do you consider yourself a fashion designer?

No, I would not say so. Fashion always needs to keep abreast with the market, and keep changing. I aim at creating a recognisable style, lasting over time. That is what I find alluring.

Where do you draw your inspiration for your creations?

Inside. I would not know where else I could find it, actually. Even in my darkest moments, I turn to creativity for Light, and it always comes forth, luckily.

What kind of clients contact you?

My client is a woman with a strong personality, a cultivated woman, choosing what she likes, not what fashion dictates. She is a woman clothing her soul, not her body.

How do you reconcile an activity like yours with new market trends and demands?

I do not reconcile them, but it is not so important to “follow” trends and demands. When you work with beauty, when beauty is your goal, you may feel alone for a long time, walking an unknown path. But at some point you realise someone is following you: someone has seen you, is trying to understand your work and, all of a sudden, you do not need to reconcile with market trends, because market itself reconciles with you, comes looking for you.

Do you think young people might be interested in undertaking this activity?

Yes, of course. When we talk about art, beauty, but also about people or women, we are speaking about the most fascinating job we can imagine. School is crucial from this point of view, just as talent is. But they are not enough, although they are vitally important. You also need courage, vision, ideas, and determination to carry it onward.

International fashion design Institutes have been sending their students to my Atelier for many years now, to get them acquainted with my work.

This year I am having a beautiful experience with young students from FIT (New York’s Fashion Institute of Technology) studying at Politecnico in Milan, and I have been able to observe how really enthusiastic, committed and creative they are. Visiting my atelier they have learnt about my work methodology, and the Institute has decided to submit a stimulating test, the realisation of a lady’s coat inspired by my work, with sartorial details and unconventional volumes.

What are the critical issues in this area? And its perspectives?

Of course, if we are merely concentrating on sales, if everything is aimed at the market, quality and beauty stay on the background. Interestingly, one of the critical issues is actually related to fashion’s excessive industrialisation. But I am convinced there are other creative men and women like me who are working in the opposite direction, and this gives me hope.

#

#

#

#